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SUBJECT: Chick Corea, a dying breed Back to Subjects
Gyuri
Mar 20 2020
at 3:12 PM
I have a relatively limited knowledge of the jazz world. I have become familiar with most of the prominent figures of the genre through PM and on recommendations from here and there. Not until recently have I got round to exploring in earnest Chick Corea’s art. I was 14 when I heard "Mad Hatter" - couldn’t make any sense of it back then. Now, 40+ years later that’s a different story altogether. I have and will always put Pat at the height of heights ever since I was first exposed to his music but CC belongs right there with him. I am now delving into his trio music right from the start and find it absolutely flabbergasting. Interestingly, - unless I have missed something - noone has devoted a subject to him on this forum. Is it maybe because his genius is so obvious that it is almost a cliché not to be considered a big deal?
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mugsy
Mar 23 2020
at 10:04 PM
Bookmark and Share Many years ago, my wife and I took our nephew who was about 7 or 8 years old, to a Chick Corea/Gary Burton show. Our nephew sat through the entire 2.5 hours without ever moving. (I thought at one point that maybe he fell asleep) At the end of the show I asked him what he thought. He looked at me in a "spacey way" and said: "I was mesmerized!" So cute... and he is now twenty something, in grad school and listens to jazz!!
franksexton
Mar 23 2020
at 3:03 PM
Bookmark and Share in response to naut , Song to John Part 1 in even better. Chick’s solo in that is sublime. I am a big fan of the original Retuen to Forever lineup as well. Not to mention the Crystal Silence album with Gary Burton.
hman01
Mar 23 2020
at 9:54 AM
Bookmark and Share I went to two concerts of Chick. Just absolutely brilliant. One was with a quartet. But, the one that wowed me even more was a concert he did at University of South Florida where he did a concert with big band arrangements. His compositions , like Pat, form an abstract narrative for me., but in a different way.
Gyuri
Mar 23 2020
at 6:09 AM
Bookmark and Share Thank you, Naut and Kooltrane, for the tips. I have listened to "Tones for Joan’s Bones" and "Now he sings, now he sobs" and find them amazing. Have already set my sights on the other recommended albums. Exploring Chick’s music I feel like a newborn baby finding everything that comes his way brand new and exciting. Looks like I will spend at least a year discovering his gems.
naut
Mar 22 2020
at 5:10 PM
Bookmark and Share Gyuri, if the early trio records that got you flabbergasted were Chick’s Circle trio, it’s understandable to see why you feel that way. That was an early sideroad he took into the ultra avant garde, which he later abandoned to better communicate with an audience. His later trio work, evident on the Akoustic Band & New Trio records, Super Trio, Trilogy and Five Trio recordings, is much more accessible and masterful. Along with "3 Quartets," another terrific album from that same period is "Friends." Can’t go wrong with either. His duo collaborations with Burton, Hiromi, McFerrin and others are also very good.
Kooltrane
Mar 22 2020
at 12:52 PM
Bookmark and Share Too many to choose from. Try "3 Quartets" w/ M. Brecker, Gadd and Gomez. Magnificent playing.
naut
Mar 20 2020
at 7:50 PM
Bookmark and Share Chick is one of the most prolific jazz recording musicians, so it’s somewhat difficult to focus on one period or several albums. However, I will recommend two of his earlier records: "Tones for Joan’s Bones" and the magnificent "Now He Sings, Now He Sobs." You’ve probably heard "Like Minds," which has Chick, Pat, Gary Burton, Dave Holland & Roy Haynes on it. Other than "Musicmagic" all the RTF stuff is good. One of my favorite all-time songs is "Song to John Part 2," on Stanley’s "Journey to Love," which has Chick, Stanley and John McLaughlin on an all-too-brief acoustic trio tribute to Trane. Enjoy your unending discoveries of Chick, Gyuri.
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